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Advocacy Cochlear Implants Communication Access Communication Practices deaf Hard of Hearing Hard of Hearing Defined Hearing Loss Hearing Loss LIVE! Talks Misconceptions Self Advocacy Sensory Loss Shame/Stigma/Denial Tribe

Hearing Loss as an Identity Crisis

When we think of hearing loss we don’t automatically think that we enter into an identity crisis.  For some, “The situation is very different for late-deafened adults. These individuals have developed a personality that does not incorporate hearing loss. They have jobs, families, and personalities and relate to those aspects of their lives as fixed. When hearing loss occurs, it is a very disorienting experience. Rapid losses are more disorienting than gradual losses. Late-deafened adults often report that their hearing loss robs them of an understanding of their identity and often initiates an identity crisis. They may manifest a “reactive” depression and/or anxiety in response to a typically external situation.”  The Psychology of Hearing Loss | The ASHA Leader

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Advocacy Communication Access Hearing Loss Lipreading Lipreading Concepts Misconceptions Personal advocacy Self Advocacy

When Lipreading Doesn’t Work

Learning lipreading strategies and the visible lip shapes adds to our communication skills but it doesn’t always work. We’ll be honest; lipreading is not foolproof. There are conditions that go against lipreading which is why we lead the Hearing Loss LIVE! classes with Lipreading Concepts

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Accessibility Accommodations Advocacy Assistive Listening Device Captioning Communication Access Hard of Hearing Hearing Loss Personal advocacy Public Advocacy

Going to the Movies with Hearing Loss

While our more experienced audience knows about accommodations at the movies, those new to hearing loss may not. Signage is usually not prominent nor do they advertise that assistive listening or caption devices are available. Most of the time, we find out peer to peer. 

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Communication Access Communication Practices Communication with Family Connections Hard of Hearing Hearing Aids Hearing Loss Personal advocacy

3 Golden Rules

The 3 Golden Rules provide better communication outcomes for everyone with hearing loss. They improve communication if you have hearing aids, cochlear implants or no hearing devices. By following these simple rules, communication breakdowns would happen less often, hearing loss or no hearing loss. They make the difference between hearing and understanding.

A purple meme with a ring of gold that has leaves coming off it. White font. The 3 Golden Rules when talking to someone with hearing loss. Get their attention before speaking. Face them while talking. Be within 6 feet.

All 3 rules were considered a social grace but they have fallen by the wayside. We are distracted and multitasking. We are tired, hangry and have a lot on our plate these days. We could all learn to slow down and connect again, properly. The 3 Golden Rules require everyone to be present. With more intention, perhaps we will have less communication breakdowns in general.

For people who have hearing loss, these 3 rules are especially important. Let’s break them down from a hearing loss perspective.

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Communication Access Hard of Hearing Hard of Hearing Defined Hearing Loss Lipreading

Lipreading “I Love You”

My earliest ‘lipreading’ moment came in elementary school when a kid ran up to me asking me to lipread him; it looked like “I love you”. I was startled with the idea of lipreading and the possible proclamation. He wanted me to guess. I was hesitant. I knew it had to be WRONG. He insisted so I said it, “I love you???” The kid laughed and said, “No! It was olive oil,” and he ran off. Ha ha ha, the joke’s on me!

green stripey background. 
Similar Visual Patterns:
I love you
Elephant shoes
olive juice
white hearing loss live logo with 3 leaves.

I love you. We see it all the time (hopefully). It’s easy to see on the lips, even for hearing kids, like I used to be. This proves that hearing people use lipreading to some degree also. For Valentine’s Day, I thought it would be fun to write about how “I love you” can look like different things on the lips.

There are more misinterpretations, I remembered from an unrelated internet search on something which led me to this discovery. “I love you” also looks similar to “elephant shoes”. Instead of the “olive oil/I love you” that I grew up with, there’s “olive juice” which looks closer to “I love you” than “olive oil”. 

Go ahead. Look in the mirror repeating all 3 phrases without voice. There’s not that much difference.