Categories
Accessibility Advocacy ASR (Automatic Speech Recognition) Captioning CART (live captioning) Employment Hard of Hearing Hearing Loss

Requesting CART

Michele: Requesting CART is something that the Hard of Hearing (HoH) do NOT do routinely. Partly due to a large percentage of HoH having no idea that CART exists as a reasonable accommodation, as outlined by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Most of us learned about CART by chance research, through our hearing loss peers, or from attending a live event where it was provided. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we got this valuable communication access information at the time we are diagnosed with hearing loss?

My first visit to my state’s Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services agency in 2006 didn’t include any information about CART. Some state agencies fail to focus on CART to the same degree as ASL Interpretation for communication access. That helps perpetuate the myth that all people with hearing loss know sign language. In reality, over 95% of people with disabling hearing loss need captioning in their spoken language, and that is CART for live events.

Categories
Accessibility Advocacy Assistive Listening Device Hard of Hearing Hearing Loss Hearing Technology

Listen Tech with Listen Everywhere

We are excited to have Listen Technologies (aka Listen Tech or Listen) as a guest this week! Listen Technologies creates assistive listening technology in a variety of formats. They have been supportive of the hearing loss community for many years, locally in Utah and with the SayWhatClub.

Check out Listen Technologies page devoted to Hearing Loss Advocacy

When you see this symbol there is an assistive listening device available for you to use.

Assistive Listening Devices (ALDs) are required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in public settings. Hearing aids are great within 6 feet but after that, ALDs are needed to fill in the gap. Hearing aids and ALDs together make a better experience, when they are compatible with hearing aids. All public settings should have some sort of system; churches, movie theaters, stadiums, schools, colleges, courtrooms and more.

Categories
Accessibility Captioning CART (live captioning) Employment Hard of Hearing Hearing Loss

Interviews

Chelle: In 2012 I attended my first Hearing Loss Association of American (HLAA) convention. A workshop I attended was called Landing That Job by Malik El-Amin. His message was to be in control of hearing loss, don’t let it control us. He shared his interview experience with us. How they questioned his cochlear implant and he gave them answers. He was knowledgeable about his technology, accommodations, and communication needs. 

That was a new concept! At the time my hearing loss controlled my life. It took me two or so years to better understand. I learned proper self advocacy, and more about technology and accommodations. There was no big aha moment. It was a slow realization that I was now in control of my hearing loss.

Categories
Communication Practices Hearing Loss Speechreading/Lipreading

Lipreading Concepts with Hearing Loss LIVE!

Registration link is here a month before classes begin.

Why Lipreading Concepts Before Lip Shapes?

Julia: There is a misconception that if you lose hearing you automatically read lips. Without knowing the concepts before you try to learn and understand the lip shapes makes for a tired student. Once the concepts are understood, students can learn lip shapes in a more relaxed atmosphere.

Chelle: While teaching lipreading with the state of Utah, we had 18 lessons. Each lesson was an hour and a half. Lip shapes and concepts were spread throughout each lesson. By lesson 4, I noticed a few people weren’t returning to class as it was overwhelming. In designing a new class with Hearing Loss LIVE!, we thought it would be more helpful to set people up with the concepts first so they are more confident later for lip shapes. 

Michele: As a lifelong lipreader, I know that when you are not confident in a situation your lipreading skills fly out the window. Keeping your composure is key. Obsessing about what you are NOT getting causes panic and works against you. Learning all of the moving parts of lipreading builds confidence, and so it makes sense to start Hearing Loss LIVE! lipreading classes with instruction and information about those concepts.

Lipreading Experience

Michele: When I was diagnosed with hearing loss in grade school, the doctor told my mother I was lipreading everything he said. I likely had had a hearing loss years before. I had no clue I was doing it, though the concept wasn’t completely foreign to me, as my grandmother was deaf and a lipreader. I’ve been lipreading for well over five decades, and the very first article that I wrote for publication was about lipreading. It is so much a part of who I am and how I communicate.

I have consulted on a few lipreading projects, transcribing a surveillance video for a law firm, and silent news footage for a documentary film. I did extensive research to prepare for both projects, but it was knowing the context and using all of the other fundamentals of lipreading that helped me make sense of what I saw on speakers’ lips while viewing the footage.

Julia: I have been involved off and on as a CART provider for Lipreading classes since 2010, both in Utah and California. As a Hard of Hearing Assistant for the State of Utah, I taught Lipreading classes online for a year. 

Chelle: I’m Hard of Hearing so I’ve been lipreading for years without knowing it. In 2013 or 2014, I started teaching the Speechreading class at the state Deaf and Hard of Hearing Center. I revised the class three times over the years, gaining experience while teaching… saving what worked and getting rid of what didn’t work. Example: Single syllable practice words destroyed the confidence of all us beginners. I changed the words to 2 or more syllables giving us more to go on. I also tried to pick common words we see daily. 

Lipreading Class experience online

Chelle: The pandemic hit and the HoH assistants were asking what they would do without in person classes. I had been wanting to try hybrid presentations to be more inclusive of people all over the state, not just certain locations. With the pandemic, I took a deep breath and within a month started the HoH program classes online. There was trial and error and thinking ahead about technology glitches so we had a teacher and backup person in case someone’s internet went down. It worked with a few jerks and bumps, which we smoothed out within a month. We found out lipreading classes are even better online than in person, because each person sits fairly close to the camera. In person we sat farther apart making it hard at times. 

Michele: Losing my hearing at such a young age hardwired me for lipreading. I am aware of how it works, but the nuances and technical aspects of articulation were new to me. When Utah opened up their online lipreading classes, I signed up for two separate classes. Being online worked great, as you could pin a speaker to view them close-up during practice. Once in a while someone’s screen would freeze, but there were no major glitches. I’ve heard many others with hearing loss over the years express an interest in learning to lipread or improve their skills, and having online classes really makes that possible no matter where you live.

Julia: My experience with lipreading in person wasn’t as a teacher but when we went online at the beginning of the pandemic, I found online was a much better platform for lipreading classes. You have the ability to turn the sound completely off but not your voice. In-person classes involve a lot of whispering. This may actually change the way you enunciate or move your mouth. 

Why I Love This Class

Julia: I learn so much from these types of classes that as a hearing person I didn’t understand before. It helps me to be better with my communication to someone with a hearing loss, because I know what may or may not come across when they are trying to lipread.

Michele: The best thing about the class was the people who attended. Getting to know one another, the camaraderie that developed, the humor, talking about our experiences, and learning from each other. We had some really awesome class discussions and came up with some improvements to the class together. I think we all gained a lot of confidence together.

An added benefit was becoming comfortable with video conferencing platforms with closed captions. I’ll be honest, I was nervous for the first few weeks. As much about Google Meet as the class. My hearing loss is profound, which means I hear no audio at all on the computer, so I was nervous about interrupting and contributing in class. It didn’t take long to become comfortable with both the class and Google Meet. The lipreading classes were actually my saving grace in those first months of Covid isolation. I am so thankful Utah opened up their online classes to other states.

Chelle: The Speechreading class gave me confidence. I learned a better way to communicate with people and became less fearful of social interaction. I found I had the added benefit of hearing better in noisy environments. Example: I cannot handle wearing my hearing aids at restaurants. The excess noise distracts me. (How do hearing people handle all that noise?!) Also, I’m not easily rattled anymore and can handle most communication situations that come up. I learned when it might be my fault for not understanding AND when it’s the speaker’s fault. 

Class Information

What: Live, in person Lipreading Concepts Class; 8 Lessons, Online with Google Meet
When: At various times of the year, check our registration page & social media.
Time: We will start classes again the second week in January 2023. Stay tuned for more information.

Cost: $50 per person ($6.25 per lesson)

Limit: 10 people per class

Registration is here and starts a month before the class begins.

Questions? Contact us.

We completed our winter 2022 class and our summer 2022 class. Here are a few testimonials:

Gloria: I am a clinical social worker and I took the Lip Reading Class offered. They created a great class for communication for those who are HOH or deaf. I am amazed at what I learned every day.  It is well worth the money to take the class and the instructors are exceptional.  I am going to use this everyday in my practice and life.  TAKE THE COURSE it will change your life. 

Maria: The class has definitely improved my communication.  My friends know to be in front of me when they speak.  And they also know if they walk away, I won’t hear them.  I communicated more clearly with health personnel during a recent medical visit. They understood my communication needs and helped advocate for me after when someone didn’t. 

Attendee: The lip-reading concepts class gave me a set of tools for receiving spoken information. No single approach to communication works all the time so having the lip-reading concepts tools and the instructors’ encouragement to keep trying was most helpful. They provided great memorable examples and resources that will remind us that there are often other approaches to understand more of the words others say.

Want to learn more about the class before registering? Join our free monthly event, Talk About It Tuesday. It’s held online via Zoom with CART/live captioning the first Tuesday of each month from 6:00 PM to 7:00 PM MST. Registration is here.

Watch our short video on Lipreading Concepts on YouTube.

Michele and Chelle Explorations Lipreading in Years Past

(No podcast companion.)

Categories
Accessibility Advocacy CART (live captioning) Hard of Hearing Hearing Loss State Agencies

State Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services

There are approximately 38 state agencies for the deaf and hard of hearing (HoH). To find out if your state has a Deaf and Hard of Hearing services, try a web search with “deaf and hard of hearing agency” with your state. Agencies are often listed under Rehabilitation Services (aka Vocational Rehabilitation), Human Services or Labor/Careerforce/Workforce offices.

The above graphic is a sampling of where services for the HoH and deaf reside in state government—Departments on Aging, Children & Families, Civil Rights, Disabilities & Communication Access, Economic Opportunity & Security, Health & Human Services, Independent Living, Industry, Long Term Support, and Social Services—and it is no wonder information can be hard to find.